Faculty of Performance, Visual Arts and Communications

Institute of Communications Studies

Professor Stephen Coleman

Professor of Political Communication

0113 343 5872

Clothworkers' Building North, 2.15

Office hours: Fridays, 1-3pm

BA (London), PhD (London)

Biography

Stephen Coleman is Professor of Political Communication at the University of Leeds, Honorary Professor in Political Science at the University of Copenhagen and Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford.

His main research interests are i) methods of political engagement; ii) uses of digital media in representative democracies; iii) intersections between popular culture and formal politics; iv) political efficacy; v) citizenship education; vi) political aesthetics, performance and rhetoric; viii) literary and dramatic representations of politics; and ix) forms of deliberation and decision-making.

 

Research Interests

Stephen’s main research interests are i) methods of political engagement; ii) uses of digital media in representative democracies; iii) intersections between popular culture and formal politics; iv) political efficacy; v) citizenship education; vi) political aesthetics, performance and rhetoric; viii) literary and dramatic representations of politics; and ix) forms of deliberation and decision-making.Current research projects include:

  • Study of news and information circulation in the city of Leeds
  • Action research on the development of speaking and listening skills for citizenship education;
  • Study of political talk in unconventional spaces;
  • Study of online deliberation, its meaning, practices and consequences.
   

Teaching

  • Stephen currently teaches on:COMM5155M The Politics of Personal Performance; COMM1920 Introduction to Communications Theory; COMM3165 Politics, Performance and Rhetoric

Publications

Books

  • Coleman S (2013) How Voters Feel. New York; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [In preparation]

  • Coleman S (2010) Leaders in the Living Room - the Prime Ministerial Debates of 2010: Evidence, Evaluation and Some Recommendations,. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

  • Coleman S; Ross K (2010) The Media and the Public: Them and Us in Media Discourse. Oxford: Blackwell-Wiley.

  • Coleman S; Coleman S; Morrison DE (2009) Public Trust in the News. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

  • Coleman S; Coleman S; Blumler JG (2009) The Internet and Democratic Citizenship: Theory, Practice and Policy. NY: Cambridge University Press.

  • Coleman S (2003) The E-Connected World: Opportunities and Risks. McGill University Press.

Journal Articles

  • Blumler JG; Coleman S (2013) “Paradigms of civic communication”, International Journal of Communication. 7.1: 173-187.

  • Coleman S (2013) “Debate on television: The spectacle of deliberation”, Television and New Media. 14.1: 20-30.

  • Moss GS; Coleman S (2013) “Deliberative Manoeuvres in the Digital Darkness: E-Democracy Policy in the UK”, British Journal of Politics and International Relations.

  • Coleman S (2012) “Believing the news: From sinking trust to atrophied efficacy”, European Journal of Communication. 27.1: 35-45.

  • Coleman S; Morrison DE; Anthony S (2012) “A CONSTRUCTIVIST STUDY OF TRUST IN THE NEWS”, Journalism Studies. 13.1: 37-53.

  • Coleman S (2012) “It's Time for the Public to Reclaim to the Public Interest”, TELEVISION & NEW MEDIA. 13.1: 7-11.

  • Coleman S; Moss GS (2012) “Under Construction: the Field of Online Deliberation Research”, Journal of Information Technology & Politics. 9.1: 1-15.

  • Coleman S; Blumler JG (2011) “The Wisdom of Which Crowd? On the Pathology of a Listening Government”, POLIT QUART. 82.3: 355-364.

  • Coleman S (2011) “Kids and Credibility: An Empirical Examination of Youth, Digital Media Use and Information Credibility”, BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES. 59.2: 201-202.

  • Blumler JG; Coleman S (2010) “Political Communication in Freefall: The British Case-and Others?”, INT J PRESS/POLIT. 15.2: 139-154.

  • Coleman S (2010) “Driving Democracy: Do Power-Sharing Institutions Work?”, INT J PRESS/POLIT. 15.2: 246-247.

  • Coleman S (2010) “Acting powerfully Performances of power in Big Brother”, INT J CULTURAL STUD. 13.2: 127-146.

  • Coleman S; Kuik A; van Zoonen L (2009) “Laughter and Liability: The Politics of British and Dutch Television Satire”, BRIT J POLIT INT REL. 11.4: 652-665.

  • Gurevitch M; Coleman S; Blumler JG (2009) “Political Communication-Old and New Media Relationships”, ANN AM ACAD POLIT SS. 625: 164-181.

  • Coleman S (2008) “The Depiction of Politicians and Politics in British Soaps”, TELEV NEW MEDIA. 9.3: 197-219.

  • Shifman L; Ward S; Coleman S (2007) “Only joking? Online humour in the 2005 UK general election”, Information Communication and Society. 10.4: 465-487.

  • Coleman S (2007) “Political marketing: A comparative perspective”, PARLIAMENT AFF. 60.1: 180-186.

  • Coleman S (2006) “Digital voices and analogue citizenship: Bridging the gap between young people and the democratic process”, Public Policy Research. 13.4: 257-261.

  • Coleman S (2006) “How the other half votes: Big Brother viewers and the 2005 general election”, International Journal of Cultural Studies. 9.4: 457-479.

  • Coleman S (2006) “How the other half votes: Big Brother viewers and the 2005 British general election campaign”, International Journal of Cultural Studies. 9.4: 457-479.

  • Coleman S (2006) “Parliamentary communication in an age of digital interactivity”, ASLIB PROC. 58.5: 371-388.

  • Coleman S (2005) “New mediation and direct representation: reconceptualizing representation in the digital age”, New Media & Society. 7.2: 177-198.

  • Coleman S (2005) “The Lonely Citizen: Indirect Representation in an Age of Networks”, Political Communication. 22.2: 197-214.

  • Coleman S (2005) “Just How Risky is Online Voting?”, None. 10

  • Coleman S (2005) “Blogs and the new politics of listening”, The Political Quarterly. 76.2: 272-280.

  • Coleman S (2004) “Connecting Parliament to the Public via the Internet: Two Case Studies of Online Consultations”, Information, Communication and Society. 7.1: 1-22.

  • Coleman S (2004) “Whose Conversation? Engaging the Public in Authentic Polylogue”, The Political Quarterly. 75.2: 112-120.

  • Coleman S (2003) “A Tale of Two Houses: The House of Commons, the Big Brother House and the People at Home”, Parliamentary Affairs. 56.4: 733-758.

  • Coleman S (2003) “Exploring New Media Effects on Representative Democracy”, None. 9.3: 1-16.

  • Coleman S (2002) “Election Call 2001”, Parliamentary Affairs. 55.4: 731-742.

  • Coleman S “Acting Powerfully: Performances of Power in Big Brother’,”, International Journal of Cultural Studies. 13.2: 127-146.

  • Coleman S “Political Communication in Freefall: the British Case – and Others?”, The International Journal of Press/Politics. 15.2: 139-154.

Chapters

  • Coleman S (2012) “The Internet as a Space for Policy Deliberation”, In: The Argumentative Turn Revisited: Public Policy as Communicative Practice. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

  • Coleman S; Blumler JG; Steibel F (2011) “Media Coverage of the Prime Ministerial Debates”, In: Wring, D., Mortimore, R. and Atkinson, S (eds.) Political Communication in Britain : The Leader's Debates, the Campaign and the Media in the 2010 General Election. Palgrave.

  • Coleman S (2011) Connecting Democracy: Online Consultation and the Flow of Political Communication. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

  • Coleman S (2010) “‘Making Citizens Online: From Virtual Boy Scouts to Activist Networks’”, In: Young People, ICTs and Democracy.

  • Coleman S (2010) “'Representation and Mediated Politics: Representing Representation in an age of Irony'”, In: Brants K; Voltmer K (eds.) Political Communication in Postmodern DEmocracy: Challenging the Primacy of Politics. Palgrave.

  • Coleman S; Morrison DE; Yates S (2010) “'The Mediation of Political Disconnection'”, In: Brants K; Voltmer K (eds.) Political Communication in Postmodern DEmocracy: Challenging the Primacy of Politics. Palgrave.

  • Coleman S (2007) “‘From Big Brother to Big Brother: two faces of interactive engagement’”, In: Dahlgren P (eds.) Young Citizens and New Media: Learning Democratic Engagement. Routledge.

  • Coleman S (2007) “‘From Big Brother to Big Brother: two faces of interactive engagement’”, In: Dahlgren P (eds.) Young Citizens and New Media: Learning Democratic Participation. Routledge. 21-40 [Submitted]

  • Coleman S (2007) “Doing it for themselves: Management versus autonomy in youth e-citizenship'”, In: Bennett WL (eds.) Civic Life Online: learning how digital media can engage youth. MIT Press. [Submitted]

  • Coleman S (2007) “'E-Democracy: the History and Future of an Idea'”, In: Quah; D; Silverstone; R; Mansell; R; Avgerou; C (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Information and Communication Technologies. Oxford University Press.

  • Coleman S (2007) “‘From Big Brother to Big Brother: two faces of interactive engagement’”, In: Dahlgren P (eds.) Young Citizens and New Media: Learning Democratic Engagement. Routledge.

  • Coleman S (2005) “New Media and Parliamentary Democracy”, In: Giddings P (eds.) The Future of Parliament: Issues for a New Century. Palgrave Macmillan. 242-253

  • Coleman S (2004) “Internet Voting and Democratic Politics in an age of crisis and risk”, In: Trechsel AH; Mendez F (eds.) The European Union and e-voting: addressing the European Parliament's internet voting challenge. Routledge. 223-236

  • Coleman S (2003) “E-coverage of Europe”, In: Bond M (eds.) Europe, Parliament and the Media. Federal Trust.

  • Coleman S (2002) “The Peoples' Voice?”, In: Atkinson S; Bartle J; Mortimore R (eds.) Political Communication: the General Election of 2001. Frank Cass. 246-258

  • Coleman S (2002) “BBC Radio Ulter's Talkback phone-in: public feedback in a divided public space”, In: Jankowski N; Prehn O (eds.) Community Media in the Information Age Perspectives and Prospects. Hampton Press. 125-150

  • Coleman S (2001) “The Online Campaign”, In: Norris P (eds.) Britain Votes, 2001. Oxford University Press.

  • Coleman S (2001) “The Transformation of Citizenship?”, In: Axford B; Huggins R (eds.) New Media and Politics. Sage.

Conferences

  • Macintosh A; Coleman S; Schneeberger A (2009) eParticipation: The Research Gaps. Proceedings: ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION, PROCEEDINGS 5694: 1-11.

Research Projects & Grants

Political Voice/Voicing Politics, funded by the British Academy

Visualising the 2015 UK General Election TV Debates, funded by the EPSRC

Research Centres & Groups

Stephen co-directs the Centre for Digital Citizenship, an interdisciplinary research centre which conducts research into the changing nature of citizenship and governance in a networked society; questions the broad range of theoretical and rhetorical claims made by proponents of e-governance and e-citizenship; contributes to the design and development of social technologies that have the potential to support public communication; engages with policy-makers in the UK, Europe and globally to understand and respond to the challenges and opportunities of citizenship in the digital era; and works with communities and social movements to explore the democratic potential of digital media.

PhD & Postdoctoral Supervision

 

I welcome enquiries from prospective PhD students and am particularly interested in supervising theses relating to

i) intersections between popular culture and political communication

ii) political performance

iii) new forms of digital citizenship (particularly in relation to young people)

iv) forms of public debate

Current students are:

Chris Birchall

Victoria Betton

Philip Lodge

Mandy Tao

Links

Visit the website for the Centre for Digital Citizenship here.

© Copyright Leeds 2014